Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Summary of significant accounting policies

v3.7.0.1
Summary of significant accounting policies
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2017
Summary of significant accounting policies [Abstract]  
Significant Accounting Policies [Text Block]
2.
Summary of significant accounting policies
 
Long-term investment
 
For an investee company over which the Company holds less than 20% voting interest, the investments are accounted for under the cost method.
 
For an investee company over which the Company has the ability to exercise significant influence, but does not have a controlling interest, the Company accounted for those using the equity method. Significant influence is generally considered to exist when the Company has an ownership interest in the voting stock of the investee between 20% and 50%. Other factors, such as representation on the investee’s board of directors, voting rights and the impact of commercial arrangements, are also considered in determining whether the equity method of accounting is appropriate.
 
An impairment charge is recorded if the carrying amount of the investment exceeds its fair value and this condition is determined to be other-than temporary. As of June 30, 2017, management believes no impairment charge is necessary.
 
Foreign currency translation and transactions
 
Highpower’s functional currency is the United States dollar ("US$"). HKHTC's functional currency is the Hong Kong dollar ("HK$"). The functional currency of Highpower's other direct and indirect wholly and majority owned subsidiaries in the PRC is the Renminbi ("RMB").
 
Most of the Company’s oversea sales are priced and settled with US$. At the date a foreign currency transaction is recognized, each asset, liability, revenue, expense, gain, or loss arising from the transaction is measured initially in the functional currency of the recording entity by use of the exchange rate in effect at that date. The increase or decrease in expected functional currency cash flows upon settlement of a transaction resulting from a change in exchange rates between the functional currency and the currency in which the transaction is denominated is recognized as foreign currency transaction gain or loss that is included in earnings for the period in which the exchange rate changes. At each balance sheet date, recorded balances that are denominated in a foreign currency are adjusted to reflect the current exchange rate.
 
The Company’s reporting currency is US$. Assets and liabilities of HKHTC and the PRC subsidiaries are translated at the current exchange rate at the balance sheet dates, revenues and expenses are translated at the average exchange rates during the reporting periods, and equity accounts are translated at historical rates. Translation adjustments are reported in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss).
 
Fair value of financial instruments
 
The carrying values of the Company’s financial instruments, including cash, restricted cash, trade and other receivables, deposits, trade and other payables and bank borrowings, approximate their fair value due to the short-term maturity of such instruments.
 
Warrant Liability
 
For warrants that are not indexed to the Company’s stock, the Company records the fair value of the issued warrants as a liability at each balance sheet date and records changes in the estimated fair value as a non-cash gain or loss in the consolidated statement of operations and comprehensive income. The warrant liability is recognized in the balance sheet at the fair value (level 3). The fair value of these warrants have been determined using the Black-Scholes pricing mode. The Black-Scholes pricing model provides for assumptions regarding volatility, call and put features and risk-free interest rates within the total period to maturity. The Company revalued the warrants utilizing a binomial model as of December 31, 2016 with no material difference in the value. The warrants expired on April 17, 2017.
 
Recently issued accounting pronouncements
 
In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (“ASU 2014-09”), which was subsequently modified in August 2015 by ASU No. 2015-14, Revenue from Contracts with Customers: Deferral of the Effective Date. This guidance will be effective for fiscal years (and interim reporting periods within those years) beginning after December 15, 2017. The core principle of ASU No. 2014-09 is that companies should recognize revenue when the transfer of promised goods or services to customers occurs in an amount that reflects what the company expects to receive. It requires additional disclosures to describe the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows from contracts with customers. In 2016, the FASB issued additional ASUs that clarify the implementation guidance on principal versus agent considerations (ASU 2016-08), on identifying performance obligations and licensing (ASU 2016-10), and on narrow-scope improvements and practical expedients (ASU 2016-12) as well as on the revenue recognition criteria and other technical corrections (ASU 2016-20). In 2017, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2017-05, Other Income—Gains and Losses from the Derecognition of Nonfinancial Assets (Subtopic 610-20), which was originally issued in ASU 2014-09. The amendments in this Update require that an entity to initially measure a retained non-controlling interest in a nonfinancial asset at fair value consistent with a how a retained non-controlling interest in a business is measured.
 
During 2016, the Company made significant progress toward its evaluation of the potential changes from adopting the new standard on its future financial reporting and disclosures. The Company has established a cross-functional implementation team on assessment on the five-step model of the new standard to its revenue contracts. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a material effect on our result of operations, financial position or liquidity. Management currently anticipates using the modified retrospective method as of January 1, 2018.
 
On February 25, 2016, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). It requires that a lessee recognize the assets and liabilities that arise from operating leases. A lessee should recognize in the statement of financial position a liability to make lease payments (the lease liability) and a right-of-use asset representing its right to use the underlying asset for the lease term. For leases with a term of 12 months or less, a lessee is permitted to make an accounting policy election by class of underlying asset not to recognize lease assets and lease liabilities. In transition, lessees and lessors are required to recognize and measure leases at the beginning of the earliest period presented using a modified retrospective approach. Public business entities should apply the amendments in ASU 2016-02 for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years (i.e., January 1, 2019, for a calendar year entity). Early application is permitted for all public business entities and all nonpublic business entities upon issuance. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of adopting ASU 2016-02 on its consolidated financial statements.
 
In August 2016, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230). The amendments in this update provide guidance on eight specific cash flow issue. It applies to all entities. For public business entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those annual periods. Early adoption is permitted for any entity in any interim or annual period. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a material impact on the Company's consolidated financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
 
In October 2016, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2016-16, Income Taxes (Topic 740). The amendments in this Update is to improve the accounting for the income tax consequences of intra-entity transfers of assets other than inventory and align the recognition of income tax consequences for intra-entity transfers of assets other than inventory with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). Public business entities should apply the amendments in ASU 2016-16 for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted for any entity in any interim or annual period. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a material impact on the Company's consolidated financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
 
In November 2016, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230). The amendments in this Update require that a statement of cash flows explain the change during the period in the total of cash, cash equivalents, and amounts generally described as restricted cash or restricted cash equivalents. The amendments in this Update are effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years. For all other entities, the amendments are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. If an entity early adopts the amendments in an interim period, any adjustments should be reflected as of the beginning of the fiscal year that includes that interim period. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a material impact on the Company's consolidated financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
 
The Company does not believe other recently issued but not yet effective accounting standards, if currently adopted, would have a material effect on the consolidated financial position, statements of operations and cash flows.